Human Rights Abuses in Ethiopia – Where is the International Community? — International Law Matters

Originally posted on Ius Gentium: Paul Gora Ethiopia is facing a crisis of unprecedented magnitude, yet its government and Western enablers refuse to acknowledge the depth of the crisis. The nation-wide protest, which started in the Oromyia region, is one that threatens to degenerate into a full-scale social explosion.[1] These protests are an extraordinary…

via Human Rights Abuses in Ethiopia – Where is the International Community? — International Law Matters

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Human Rights Abuses in Ethiopia – Where is the International Community?

Ius Gentium

Paul Gora

 

Ethiopia is facing a crisis of unprecedented magnitude, yet its government and Western enablers refuse to acknowledge the depth of the crisis. The nation-wide protest, which started in the Oromyia region, is one that threatens to degenerate into a full-scale social explosion.[1] These protests  are an extraordinary display of defiance by Ethiopia’s people against a repressive government.

While protests began in small villages and towns in 2014, the protests erupted in early July 2016 after a development plan was released that sought to expand the territorial limits of Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa in to Oromyia villages and towns. This was seen as a move to further accelerate the Oromo farmer evection from their ancestral land.[2] The government dismissed the protesters as “anti-peace” elements and accused them of acting in collaboration with a terrorist group, a common tactic used by Ethiopian government to crackdown on dissident…

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Concrete Walls and Bureaucratic Barriers to Access to Justice for Migrants — UK Human Rights Blog

Work recently began on a wall in Calais, funded by the UK government, to prevent migrants and asylum seekers from crossing the Channel to Britain. Nearly simultaneously, the government announced that it would increase immigration tribunal fees by over 500%, erecting a different type of barrier—to access to justice. It was claimed that doing so would bring […]

via Concrete Walls and Bureaucratic Barriers to Access to Justice for Migrants — UK Human Rights Blog

A new animation about the birth of the European Convention on Human Rights — UK Human Rights Blog

Almost six years ago, not long after this blog started, we published a lovely post by Tom Blackmore, the grandson of David Maxwell Fyfe. Maxwell Fyfe was a Conservative lawyer and politician who went from being the British Deputy Chief Prosecutor at the Nuremberg War Crimes trials to being instrumental in drafting the European Convention […]

via A new animation about the birth of the European Convention on Human Rights — UK Human Rights Blog

Prosecution of Italian traffickers can go ahead even after Romania’s accession to EU — UK Human Rights Blog

Paoletti and others (Judgment) [2016] EUECJ C-218/15 (6 October 2016) – read judgment The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has ruled that people smugglers can be punished even if the illegal immigrants themselves have subsequently gained EU citizenship by dint of the relevant country’s accession to the EU. Legal and factual background […]

via Prosecution of Italian traffickers can go ahead even after Romania’s accession to EU — UK Human Rights Blog

Guest Post by Lily Rueda Guzman: Catching the Tiger by the Tail: Colombians Vote against Peace Agreement with the FARC-EP but Hope for Peace Remains — Armed Groups and International Law

Lily Rueda Guzman is a Colombian lawyer who specializes in the interaction between criminal law and human rights in the context of political transitions. She holds an LLM in Human Rights and International Criminal Law from Utrecht University and is Magister from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. ————————————————————————– The events of the last two weeks in […]

via Guest Post by Lily Rueda Guzman: Catching the Tiger by the Tail: Colombians Vote against Peace Agreement with the FARC-EP but Hope for Peace Remains — Armed Groups and International Law

Mandatory order to stop bribery investigation? — UK Human Rights Blog

R (o.t.a Soma Oil & Gas) v. Director of the Serious Fraud Office [2016] EWHC 2471 (Admin) 12 October 2016 – read judgment Soma are investing heavily ($40m spent on seismic work) in looking at oil and gas extraction in Somalia, so it was a bit of a set-back, to say the least, when their “capacity-building” […]

via Mandatory order to stop bribery investigation? — UK Human Rights Blog